Tye Gregory, CEO of the Jewish Community Relations Council Bay Area, speaks about Israeli democracy at San Francisco's Union Square in September 2023. (Aaron Levy-Wolins/J. Staff)
Tye Gregory, CEO of the Jewish Community Relations Council Bay Area, speaks about Israeli democracy at San Francisco's Union Square in September 2023. (Aaron Levy-Wolins/J. Staff)

‘A stronger voice’: Silicon Valley Jewish Community Relations Council merges with larger Bay Area JCRC

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The Jewish Community Relations Council of Silicon Valley has merged with the larger JCRC that serves the rest of the Bay Area.

JCRC Bay Area, which acts as the public relations and political affairs branch of the mainstream Jewish community, covers San Francisco; Marin, Sonoma and Napa counties in the North Bay; Alameda, Contra Costa and Solano counties in the East Bay; and San Mateo County on the Peninsula. Now its activities will extend farther south to include Santa Clara County, which includes San Jose, Sunnyvale and Los Gatos.

“Working closely with Jewish Silicon Valley, our partnership enables a stronger voice and representation in all nine united Bay Area counties,” JCRC Bay Area said in an email announcement.

“Jewish Silicon Valley firmly believes collaborating with and funding other organizations to address the common challenges facing the Jewish community, and creating collective solutions, is key to providing a stronger Jewish future,” Daniel Klein, CEO of Jewish Silicon Valley, said on the JSV website.

In practice, this means that Jewish Silicon Valley, which was formed in 2022 by a merger of the Addison-Penzak JCC in Los Gatos and the Jewish Federation of Silicon Valley, has become one of JCRC Bay Area’s “major funders,” according to the JCRC Silicon Valley.

The merger, which went into effect on July 1, was announced to the community via email Tuesday.

It is one of several recent changes for JCRC Bay Area, which has sought to consolidate and strengthen its focus on fighting antisemitism and anti-Israel activities in the region. Two of its programs underwent significant changes on July 1: The Jewish Coalition for Literacy ceased to exist after 25 years, while the Institute for Curriculum Services, which fights antisemitism in textbooks and classrooms, was spun off as its own nonprofit.