Baked Potato “Khachapuri.” (Photo/Faith Kramer)
Baked Potato “Khachapuri.” (Photo/Faith Kramer)

Passover potato dishes: croquettes, and a twist on khachapuri

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Potatoes are my go-to solution for family Passover meals. Here I’ve used baked potato as the “crust” of a Pesach interpretation of the traditional Georgian egg and cheese stuffed bread known as khachapuri.

Brushed with spiced butter and filled with egg and three types of cheese, the potato halves make a nice brunch, lunch or light dinner (accompanied by sliced tomatoes or a green salad).

Reserve the scooped-out potato insides for another dish, perhaps a batch of Asian-inspired mashed potato croquettes adapted for Passover from a Hanukkah latke recipe.


Baked Potato “Khachapuri”

Serves 4 to 8

  • 4 Idaho or russet baking potatoes, each 8-10 oz.
  • ¼ cup unsalted butter
  • 1 Tbs. minced garlic
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • ½ tsp. ground black pepper
  • ¼ tsp. plus ½ tsp. paprika
  • ½ cup finely chopped or shredded mozzarella
  • ½ cup finely chopped or shredded Muenster
  • 8 large eggs
  • ¼ cup crumbled feta
  • 2 to 3 Tbs. chopped parsley
  • Hot sauce, optional

Heat oven to 450 degrees. Pierce potatoes in a few spots. Bake on baking sheet until a fork can easily pierce through to center (about 45 to 60 minutes). Let cool until potatoes can be handled.

Halve the potatoes lengthwise. With a small spoon hollow out each half, leaving ¼ inch of potato on sides and bottom. Reserve scooped-out potato for another use.

Heat oven to 350 degrees. In a small pot, melt butter with garlic over low heat. Stir in salt, pepper and ¼ tsp. paprika. Brush inside potato shells, reserving rest for later use. Mix together mozzarella and Muenster cheeses. Place ½ Tbs. cheese in each potato cavity. Return to baking sheet and heat in oven for about 5 minutes until cheeses begin to melt.

Remove potatoes from oven but leave on. Break an egg on a small plate, keeping yolk intact. Slide egg into a potato shell. Repeat with remaining eggs and potatoes. Reheat butter and drizzle on top of eggs. Return to oven. Bake until whites of the eggs are just set (about 5 to 10 minutes). Sprinkle 1 Tbs. of cheese on top. Continue to bake until yolks are cooked to desired doneness (timing will vary), testing yolks with toothpick.

Sprinkle with remaining mixed cheeses, feta, ½ tsp. paprika and parsley. Serve immediately with a dash of hot sauce (if desired).


Gingered Mashed Potato Croquettes

Makes 8 to 12

  • About 2 to 3 cups reserved baked potato flesh (see note)
  • ½ cup thinly sliced green onions
  • ½ to 1 tsp. grated fresh ginger
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • ¼ tsp. black pepper
  • 1 large egg, beaten
  • About 3 to 4 Tbs. plus 1 to 2 cups matzah cake meal
  • About 1 to 2 cups matzah meal
  • Vegetable oil for greasing and frying
  • Lemon wedges

Mash baked potato with green onions, ginger (use ½  tsp. for a milder taste), salt, and black pepper until somewhat smooth. Stir in egg and 3 Tbs. matzah cake meal. If very wet, add additional cake meal by the tablespoonful. If the batter is too dry, add water by the teaspoonful. Mixture should hold together when shaped into a patty.

Pour 1 cup matzah meal and 1 cup cake meal into separate rimmed large bowls. Wet hands and take ¼ cup of the batter and shape into a patty about 3 inches in diameter. Dip into cake meal, flipping it to cover both sides then dip into matzah meal, covering both sides. Place patty on greased plate. Repeat, adding more matzah meal and matzah cake meal to bowls as needed.

Heat 1-inch oil in a large, deep skillet over medium-high heat. Working in batches, put patties in hot oil and flatten slightly with spatula. Fry about 2 minutes on each side until golden brown. Add oil as needed. Drain on paper towels. Serve with lemon wedges.

Notes: Adjust quantities depending on amount of leftover potato. Substitute any cooked potato for the leftover.

Faith Kramer
Faith Kramer

Faith Kramer is a Bay Area food writer and the author of “52 Shabbats: Friday Night Dinners Inspired by a Global Jewish Kitchen.” Her website is faithkramer.com. Contact her at [email protected].